Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











IMPORTANT INFORMATION:


* Prices and Available Plants are listed
on the athruz page only,
so please click athruz link!
https://www.succulents.us/athruz.html

Minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list and
address. We'll check availability and
& send you a PayPal invoice:
succulentsus@gmail.com
To visit our nursery in Solana Beach, CA.
please call 858 342 9781 for an appointment

Our Web addresses &
website are for Sale!



Our web addresses are succulentsus.com succulents.us succulentgardening.com succulentflowers.com
please email us with your telephone number and your offer
Thank you from Tina & Joe

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Ibervillea lindheimeri

Ibervillea lindheimeri is in the Cucurbitaceae family.  It was given this name by Edward Lee Greene in 1895. It is found in Mexico and south-western U.S.A., growing in busk land with a well drained soil with some water and some sun. The caudex can grow up to about 15” in diameter, the vines will reach about 10’. The flowers are yellow and greenish.  Ibervillea is dioecious, there are separate male and female plants. This gourd has tubular flowers with 5 spreading lobes, creamy-yellow, about 1/2 inch wide. Leaves are 1 1/2-3 1/4 inches long with 3-5 lobes, deeply cut and fine-toothed. The fruit is over 1 inch in diameter, with green stripes when young, but bright red when ripe. Before maturing it has a spiny-looking green covering which it sheds as it develops. The vine climbs 6-10 feet high by means of tendrils. This species is named after Ferdinand Jacob Lindheimer (1801-1879) who is often called the Father of Texas Botany because of his work as the first permanent-resident plant collector in Texas. Lindheimer immigrated to the United States in 1834 as a political refugee. He spent from 1843-1852 collecting specimens in Texas. He settled in New Braunfels, Texas in 1844 and was granted land on the banks of the Comal River, where he continued his plant collecting and attempted to establish a botanical garden. He shared his findings with many others who shared his interest in botany, including Ferdinand von Roemer and Adolph Scheele. Lindheimer is credited with the discovery of several hundred plant species. In addition his name is used to designate forty-eight species and subspecies of plants. He is buried in New Braunfels. His house, on Comal Street in New Braunfels, is now a museum.

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