Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











IMPORTANT INFORMATION:


* Lots of New & Available Plants*
on our a thru z page, so please click link!
https://www.succulents.us/athruz.html

Minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list and
address. We'll check availability and
& send you a PayPal invoice:
succulentsus@gmail.com
To visit our nursery, please call
858 342 9781 for an appointment

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Our web addresses are succulentsus.com succulents.us succulentgardening.com succulentflowers.com
please email us with your telephone number and your offer
Thank you from Tina & Joe

MAY OUR PLANTS GROW WITH YOU!

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Dudleya pachyphytum hybrid

Dudleya pachyphytum (Cedros Island Liveforever) A ground-hugging slowly-clumping succulent to 1 foot tall by 2 feet wide with a thick basal stem from which form many branches bearing 5 to 10 inch wide rosettes of interesting leaves that are unlike all other Dudleya. These leaves are very thick, somewhat blunt at the tips and rounded on the edges and have a beautiful white waxy coating. In mid-summer appears the long inflorescence, slightly pink at the base but otherwise covered with the same white coating as the leaves and bearing tight cymes of pale green to whitish flowers. These flowers barely open but are decorated with the same white coating as with the inflorescence stems and leaves. Plant in a very well-drained soil in full sun to bright light - give some protection in inland hot sun. It grows well with winter and spring rains and, unlike many others in the genus, will respond well to regular to occasional irrigation in summer months. Hardy to at least 18 F (as it withstood this in our collection in 1990). This is a great plant for the rock garden, a crack in a rock or wall or as a container specimen. The name Dudleya is named for William R. Dudley (1849-1911) a botanist at Stanford University. The specific epithet "pachyphytum" was given to this plant when Reid Moran and Michael Benedict described it in May 1981 in the Cactus and Succulent Society of America Journal. It is an interesting specific name as it is the same name used for the genus of related plants from Mexico which gets its meaning from the Latin words 'pachy' mean "massive" and 'phytum' meaning "leaves" and is a fitting name as the leaves do resemble those of various species of Pachyphytum. Dudleya pachyphytum grows on steep rocky areas on north facing cliffs above 2,000 feet on the frequently foggy north western slopes of Cedros Island, located in the Pacific Ocean west of Baja California. This species was discovered only fairly recently because of the relative isolation of Cedros Island itself and because this northern area is a more inaccessible part of the island. Michael Benedict from the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden was the first to document finding this plant in 1971 but the plant he found was one that that had washed down the main northern canyon, Canada de la Mina. He returned in 1975 and 1977 to find plants along cliffs to the north and west of this canyon. In 1977 Alfred Lau and Antonio Garcia also discovered many plants of this species growing at the top of the ridge above of the Canada de la Mina and this discovery with excellent photographs of the plant were published in the Cactus and Succulent Society of America Journal in September 1980, before Moran and Benedict described it. There is an unfortunate story circulating that groups visiting Cedros Island in 2010 removed a large number of this species from their natural habitat. If this is fact and not rumor, we find this news very sad and urge visitors to any natural habitat not to dig plants such as this from the wild. Information from San Marcos growers Santa Barbara
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