Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











IMPORTANT INFORMATION:


* Prices and Available Plants are listed
on the A thru Z & Specimen pages only,
so please click links!
https://www.succulents.us/athruz.html
https://www.succulents.us/specimens.html
Minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list and
address. We'll check availability and
& send you a PayPal invoice:
succulentsus@gmail.com
To visit our nursery in Solana Beach, CA.
please call 858 342 9781 for an appointment

Our Web addresses &
website are for Sale!



Our web addresses are succulentsus.com succulents.us succulentgardening.com succulentflowers.com
please email us with your telephone number and your offer
Thank you from Tina & Joe

MAY OUR PLANTS GROW WITH YOU!

Check Dormancy Table to SEE WHAT'S GROWING & WHAT'S DORMANT

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Please SCROLL DOWN for PLANT INFORMATION
click to go back to A through Z page

Bursera species & Bursera hindsiana


Origin and Habitat: Mexico ( Baja California, Baja California Sur, Sinaloa, Sonora and Zacatecas) especially common and conspicuous in in western Sonora and almost all of Baja California with a few marginal populations in south-central Arizona (reaching northern limits in some Phoenix-area mountain parks) and extreme southern California. Its distribution nearly coincides with the extent of the Sonoran Desert. Altitude range: From near sea level 915 metres. Habitat and ecology: Sonoran desertscrub in slopes, bajadas, canyons, arroyos and plains. Bursera microphylla is the most northerly member of the Burseraceae in North America and also perhaps the most xeromorphic species within the genus as it thrives in the extremely arid desert. Birds appear to be primarily responsible for seed dispersal in Bursera. While the aromatic sap of this and other burseras smells pleasant to humans, it tastes foul and functions as an herbivore deterrent. This defense is apparently effective, since the Bursera's foliage is nearly always intact.
Bursera hindisana is a large, deciduous shrub or small tree that grows up to fifteen feet tall and tends to spread. It has smooth, resinous, reddish bark that becomes greyish with age. The plant often develops a swollen caudex above the ground where it stores water.  The plant oozes an aromatic resin when cut or wounded. Its aromatic leaves, which measure up to two inches in length, are dark green in color, grow at branch tips and are velvety with scalloped edges. Leaves may be simple, trifoliate, or compound with five to seven leaflets.  In the fall, the plant bears inconspicuous white flowers, which are quickly followed by fleshy, yellow to reddish-brown fruit.  Seeds are black, oval shaped and covered with a fleshy orange aril. Some of this informaiton is from the University of Arizona. Click photo for more information & other photos.

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