Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |






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Ficus macrophylla

Ficus macrophylla, commonly known as the Moreton Bay fig, is a large evergreen banyan tree of the family that is a native of most of the eastern coast of Australia from the Atherton Tableland (17° S) in the north to the Illawarra(34° S) in New South Wales, and Lord Howe Island. Its common name is derived from Moreton Bay in Queensland , Australia . It is best known for its beautiful buttress roots. As Ficus macrophylla is a strangler fig , seed germination usually takes place in the canopy of a host tree and the seedling lives as an epiphyte until its roots establish contact with the ground. It then enlarges and strangles its host, eventually becoming a freestanding tree by itself. Individuals may reach 200 ft in height. Like all figs, it has an obligate mutualism with fig wasps figs are only pollinated by fig wasps, and fig wasps can only reproduce in fig flowers. Ficus macrophylla is widely used as a feature tree in public parks and gardens in warmer climates such as California, Portugal, Italy (Sicily, Sardinia and Liguria), northern New Zealand (Auckland), and Australia. Old specimens can reach tremendous size. Its aggressive root system allows its use in only the largest private gardens.

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