Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











OUR WEBSITE IS FOR SALE!
email us with your telephone number and your offer

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
We don't have a lot of plants so...
*Available plants are listed on our
A thru Z, Echeveria and Specimen pages.
Please just click the links above on our
Catalogue pages.*
Our minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list with
your address we'll check availability and
& we'll send you a PayPal invoice

Send an email to: succulentsus@gmail.com
or call 858 342 9781 for an appointment



Thank you from Tina & Joe

MAY OUR PLANTS GROW WITH YOU!

Check Dormancy Table to SEE WHAT'S GROWING & WHAT'S DORMANT
For help with a sick succulent plant, please check the internet.
We no longer diagnose sick plants.

My instagram link

Please SCROLL DOWN for PLANT INFORMATION
click to go back to Ficus/Fockea page

Ficus benjamina nana

Winter hardy to USDA Zones 10-12. Grow well indoors in a soil-based potting mix. Bright indirect light or in sunny areas with some afternoon shade. Water regularly during the growing season, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings. Avoid overwatering. Reduce watering from fall to late winter. This plant may be taken outside in spring after last frost date and brought back inside in fall. Prune to shape as needed.Ficus benjamina, commonly called weeping fig, is native from India to northern Australia. It is a broadleaf evergreen tree that grows to 50’ tall. It is widely grown in the tropics as an ornamental tree or hedge. For many years, it has been an extremely popular indoor houseplant because of its attractive shape and tolerance for a variety of growing conditions. Houseplants are more often grown in the 2-10’ tall range. Pale brownish trunk with a dense cone of foliage. Trunks are sometimes braided for ornamental interest. Glossy, pointed, oval to elliptic leaves (to 4” long). Twigs arch gracefully. Stems have milky sap. This tree rarely flowers or fruits indoors. Even if flowers were produced, fruit production would still be unlikely in large part because of the absence of the necessary pollinating wasps. Genus name comes from the Latin name for Ficus carica the edible fig. This information is from the Missouri botanical garden website
Back to top of Page
Back to top of Page