Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

A thru Z | Aeonium | Agaves | Aloes | Cactaceae|
Caudiciforms | Cotyledons & Graptos | Cuttings|
Crassulas, Adromischus, Dudleyas + | Echeveria |
Euphorbia/Monadeniums | Ficus & Fockea |
Gasteria & Haworthia | Kalanchoes | Mesembs |
Othonna~Pelargonium | Sansevieria~Sempervivum |
POTS & Supplies | Sedum | Senecio | Specimens |











Our Web addresses &
website are for Sale!



Our web addresses are succulentsus.com succulents.us succulentgardening.com succulentflowers.com
please email us with your telephone number and your offer

IMPORTANT INFORMATION:

*To see our Available plants
click this link
https://www.succulents.us/athruz.html
Our minimum order shipped is $50.
To Order plants, email your list with
your address we'll check availability and
& send you a PayPal invoice

Send an email to: succulentsus@gmail.com
or call 858 342 9781 for an appointment



Thank you from Tina & Joe

MAY OUR PLANTS GROW WITH YOU!

Check Dormancy Table to SEE WHAT'S GROWING & WHAT'S DORMANT
For help with a sick succulent plant, please check the internet.
We no longer diagnose sick plants.

My instagram link

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click to go back to Euphorbia page

Euphorbia flanaganii crested

Euphorbia flanaganii, native to South Africa, is one of the "medusoids", or plants forming a central basal "caudex" with "arms" arising from the basal area. This is the cristate form, which forms deep emerald green fan-shaped stems that resemble "green coral". Cristate forms generally occur when injury occurs to the plant at a young age (this damage can be due to insects eating the growing tip, or from many other causes, including a genetic predisposition). In reaction to the "injury", the cells at the tip of the branch where growth occurs begin to multiply at a much faster rate and the normal growing tip "goes crazy", creating fantastic whorls and fans.All Euphorbias contain a white sap that can be irritating to eyes and mucous membranes. Euphorbia flanaganii is also known as the Medusa plant. Hardy to just under 40 degrees f.
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