Succulent Gardening: The Art of Nature

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*MINIMUM domestic ORDER shipped is $50 before freight charges*

May our plants grow with you!

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*International shipping $100 minimum*

before freight charges have been added*

If Phytosanitary certificate is required,

there is a minimum 3-5 per species, depending

Please do NOT place international orders before inquiring


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IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
CHECK Dormancy Table to SEE WHAT'S GROWING & WHAT'S DORMANT

We generally ship Orders placed between Monday and Thursday at noon, the following Monday. When possible, we ship on Wednesdays.
We don't want orders to sit over the weekend.

We remove some of the soil when we ship. Succulents are unlike other plants in that there are usually
no issues with a plants out of soil or kept dry for a week or more. When you receiver your plants, put them
into a pot with moist soil. As a general rule, plant in a pot twice as big as the root ball.

Regards watering: give
the roots opportunity to start reaching down for water.
Please check to see if your plants should be watered at the time of year you purchase.
Some don't get water in winter and some no water in summer.
How often you water depends on how quickly your soil dries out. Most important, don't overwater.

The photos on our website represent what plants look like when grown.
We are not selling the plant in the photo.
Whether your plant has flowers depends on whether it is flowering at that time.
A pot may be one large plant or more than one plant. Plants grow at a different pace and different sizes
so if you order 2 plants coming out of the same size pot, they may not be the same size.

Sale plants may require additional freight payment

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Dinteranthus puberulus

Description: Dinteranthus puberulus is a small stemless succulent that grows above ground and not markedly buried after the manner of D. vanzylii. It is usually solitary or few branched, but subspecies 'puberulus' forms small compact groups with 3-7 branches up 2 to 3 cm high, each with a single leaf-pair in the resting state.
Plant body (Leaf-pairs):
The plant has only pairs of boat-shaped, leaves about 2,5 cm long and broad with an inconspicuous keel, they are connate (united) to their length for 1/3 to 2/3 with a wide gap. Leaves are trigonus with convex sides as seen from above and semi-oval to semi-orbicular in side view. The leaves are chalky white suffused with violet or reddish, they are covered with green dots and without 'windows'. The epidermis of subs. 'microspermus' is galbrous while in subs. 'puberulus' the surface is green dotted and velvety due to hair-like papillae. The outer epidermal walls with a layer of crystal sand (not visible to the naked eyes) has a characteristically glittering shine.
Flowers:
Solitary, yellow or whitish often tipped with reddish, filaments basally white erect, staminodes absent,
Fruit: The fruit is a 6-10 locular capsule with broadly winged valves.
Cultivation: Dinteranthus are summer growing species with dry rest period over winter but they do not shows an apparent dormant season like Lithops. Easy to grow they need a very open mineral, fast draining mix with little compost and a high degree of grit, coarse sand, small lava gravel or pebbles. Give them the maximum amount of light you are able to give them, but care should be taken about exposing them to the full blast of the sun rays in summer (The only exception to this is seedlings in their first year that enjoy a shades place) . Such tiny plants can easily get scorched or broiled and their appearance spoiled (this may not matter in the wild, where the Dinteranthus have probably shrunk into the ground and becomes covered with sands). The basic cultivation routine is: Gives some water all year, more in Spring and again in autumn. Keep rather dry during coldest winter month and start watering regularly after the old leaves completely dry. (Usually late March or Early April) Water freely during the growing season, soak the compost fully but allow it to dry out between waterings. Some growers fertilize frequently, some hardly ever. Nearly all problems occur as a result of overwatering and poor ventilation especially when weather conditions are dull and cool or very humid. If too much water is supplied the plants will grow out of character, bloat, split and rot. Keep them in small pots as solitary clumps or as colonies in large, shallow terracotta seed pans. When in doubt DON'T WATER. Where the resting season is in the winter and central heating gives very dry air in the home, give a light top spray once a week to simulate the desert dew and prevent excessive dehydration. Overwinter them preferably not below 5° C (but they endure some freeze if very dry).
Note: After flowering in the summer and extending through winter season the plant doesn’t need watering, but they will still be growing, the new bodies will be increasing in size extracting water from the outer succulent leaves, allowing them to shrivel away. In fact the plant in this time extracts water and nutrient stored in the outer succulent leaves, allowing them to dehydrate relocating the water to the rest of the plant and to the new leaves that form during this period until the old leaves are reduced to nothing more than "thin papery shells". Propagation: From seed (very small) or by dividing older clumps. Slow growing for a mesemb.

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